Day 2 – 第2回

I was fortunate enough to be present for today’s Session 4: Nuclear Safety and Security. Mr. Gustavo Caruso, Head of the Nuclear Safety Action Team with the IAEA, gave an exciting talk on the background of the IAEA and the role of the organization following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident. I was informed of the tireless efforts of the IAEA to ensure the safety of NPPs, and came to realize the importance of disaster preparation and NPP safety. A thorough review of the rules and regulations governing NPPs and an increased role for the IAEA in the process appeared a great idea to me!

Ambassador Bonnie D. Jenkin’s presentation on Nuclear Terrorism highlighted to me the serious threats posed by nuclear terrorism not only in Asia, but across the entire globe. Just the terms ‘nuclear weapons’ and ‘terrorists’ used in the same sentence function as a reminder of the potential fallout if the two were ever truly combined. For this reason, initiatives such as Resolution 1540 should be pursued with the utmost priority.

Mr. Miles Pomper’s presentation illuminated an interesting and personal issue for me – the ongoing reprocessing of nuclear fuel in Japan when the future of nuclear power in the country remains uncertain. It seems to me that, as the country seeks to recover from the Fukushima fallout, it is only digging deeper the hole from which it is trying to escape. Similarly, increasing domestic stocks of plutonium surely functions as a poor example for other countries.

The notion of a ‘nuclear renaissance’ strikes me as a real concern following the Fukushima accident – it seems odd to me that though the world should be more alert to the dangers associated with nuclear power, countries continue to increase their reliance on it in order to meet new demands when they should be seeking sustainable and renewable sources of energy. The emergence of certain international developments that could damper the nuclear renaissance provided me with a slight relief, though I do hope the advent of a ‘nuclear renaissance’ never comes to be.Through the images on her presentation slides, Ms. Kay Kitazawa drove home the lessons of 03/11/2011 and the Fukushima fallout.

I’ve learned that the issues associated with nuclear technology run deep and are not only limited to civilian uses of nuclear energy. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Initiative are just two of many efforts made in an attempt to rid the world of nuclear weapons. Today reminded me that even though a world free of the risks associated with nuclear weapons and a reliance on nuclear energy is a long way off, we must continue to believe and never lose hope!

Your student blogger,
Vincent

今日のセッション4ではまず「原子力安全と核セキュリティ」についてなんですが、最初は国際原子力機関IAEAの方から発表がありました。福島第一原発事故のあと、IAEAがどんなレスポンスをとったか、原発事故をきっかけに次世代の原発にどんな規制を新たに取り込むかなどを聞くことができました。つぎに、核テロがアジアだけではなく世界への脅威について聞いたときに、核兵器とテロという二つの恐ろしいものが一つになればどんなに怖いのかを知らされました。

さらに、最もおもしろいと思った発表はこんなテーマです:「原子力拡散:核ルネッサンスのリスク」。福島第一原発事故のあと、世界中が原発について遠慮するはずだが、なぜかまさか世界中に原発増設が続々と行われているそうです。次世代エネルギーや、シェールガスの採掘ができるようになった今は、このルネッサンスが起きないことを期待しましょう!

核燃料のリサイクルが日本で行われています。ほぼ全ての原発が止まっている、未来の見通しも立たない状況の今ではなぜ核燃料リサイクルをやり続け、プルトニウムの在庫を増やしていますか?これは海外からみれば核兵器に作るための材料を増やし続けているという、あまりいいイメージではありませんね。

最後に、福島第一原発事故からの教訓もプレゼンされ、事故のあらゆる原因を検討された福島原発事故独立検証委員会からの話を聞くことができました。

セッション5では核軍縮・不拡散体制の現状と課題についての議論が展開されました。NPTおよびNPDI(軍縮・不拡散イニシアティブ)について知り、その近況と課題などについて勉強できました。世界中に、まだ核軍縮・不拡散のために努力をしている国々や人々がいっぱいいるので、例えば今各国の領土問題や軍事緊迫などどんなに困難なタスクでも希望を捨てずに頑張っていけば必ず問題解決できると思いました。

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