Day 2 – 第2回

I was fortunate enough to be present for today’s Session 4: Nuclear Safety and Security. Mr. Gustavo Caruso, Head of the Nuclear Safety Action Team with the IAEA, gave an exciting talk on the background of the IAEA and the role of the organization following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident. I was informed of the tireless efforts of the IAEA to ensure the safety of NPPs, and came to realize the importance of disaster preparation and NPP safety. A thorough review of the rules and regulations governing NPPs and an increased role for the IAEA in the process appeared a great idea to me!

Ambassador Bonnie D. Jenkin’s presentation on Nuclear Terrorism highlighted to me the serious threats posed by nuclear terrorism not only in Asia, but across the entire globe. Just the terms ‘nuclear weapons’ and ‘terrorists’ used in the same sentence function as a reminder of the potential fallout if the two were ever truly combined. For this reason, initiatives such as Resolution 1540 should be pursued with the utmost priority.

Mr. Miles Pomper’s presentation illuminated an interesting and personal issue for me – the ongoing reprocessing of nuclear fuel in Japan when the future of nuclear power in the country remains uncertain. It seems to me that, as the country seeks to recover from the Fukushima fallout, it is only digging deeper the hole from which it is trying to escape. Similarly, increasing domestic stocks of plutonium surely functions as a poor example for other countries.

The notion of a ‘nuclear renaissance’ strikes me as a real concern following the Fukushima accident – it seems odd to me that though the world should be more alert to the dangers associated with nuclear power, countries continue to increase their reliance on it in order to meet new demands when they should be seeking sustainable and renewable sources of energy. The emergence of certain international developments that could damper the nuclear renaissance provided me with a slight relief, though I do hope the advent of a ‘nuclear renaissance’ never comes to be.Through the images on her presentation slides, Ms. Kay Kitazawa drove home the lessons of 03/11/2011 and the Fukushima fallout.

I’ve learned that the issues associated with nuclear technology run deep and are not only limited to civilian uses of nuclear energy. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Initiative are just two of many efforts made in an attempt to rid the world of nuclear weapons. Today reminded me that even though a world free of the risks associated with nuclear weapons and a reliance on nuclear energy is a long way off, we must continue to believe and never lose hope!

Your student blogger,
Vincent

今日のセッション4ではまず「原子力安全と核セキュリティ」についてなんですが、最初は国際原子力機関IAEAの方から発表がありました。福島第一原発事故のあと、IAEAがどんなレスポンスをとったか、原発事故をきっかけに次世代の原発にどんな規制を新たに取り込むかなどを聞くことができました。つぎに、核テロがアジアだけではなく世界への脅威について聞いたときに、核兵器とテロという二つの恐ろしいものが一つになればどんなに怖いのかを知らされました。

さらに、最もおもしろいと思った発表はこんなテーマです:「原子力拡散:核ルネッサンスのリスク」。福島第一原発事故のあと、世界中が原発について遠慮するはずだが、なぜかまさか世界中に原発増設が続々と行われているそうです。次世代エネルギーや、シェールガスの採掘ができるようになった今は、このルネッサンスが起きないことを期待しましょう!

核燃料のリサイクルが日本で行われています。ほぼ全ての原発が止まっている、未来の見通しも立たない状況の今ではなぜ核燃料リサイクルをやり続け、プルトニウムの在庫を増やしていますか?これは海外からみれば核兵器に作るための材料を増やし続けているという、あまりいいイメージではありませんね。

最後に、福島第一原発事故からの教訓もプレゼンされ、事故のあらゆる原因を検討された福島原発事故独立検証委員会からの話を聞くことができました。

セッション5では核軍縮・不拡散体制の現状と課題についての議論が展開されました。NPTおよびNPDI(軍縮・不拡散イニシアティブ)について知り、その近況と課題などについて勉強できました。世界中に、まだ核軍縮・不拡散のために努力をしている国々や人々がいっぱいいるので、例えば今各国の領土問題や軍事緊迫などどんなに困難なタスクでも希望を捨てずに頑張っていけば必ず問題解決できると思いました。

ヴィンセント

Advertisements

Day 1 – 第1回

Today, I was fortunate enough to sit in on Session 3: “Small Arms and Light Weapon Control”. According to a UN report on small arms and light weapons by government experts, there are three types of small arms, including those “small arms” which can be transported by an individual, “light weapons” which are often vehicle mounted and mobile, and high explosives. These weapons form the broad category of weaponry entitled Small Arms and Light Weapons (SALW) and are possessed, both legally and illegally, in massive quantities by militant groups, non-government actors and human rights abusers. I was shocked to hear that these weapons account for over half a million civilian deaths every year.

In fact, small arms are called “de facto mass-destruction weapons”. Small arms not only intensify conflicts, but also disturb humanitarian relief operations and foster the recurrence of disputes. I heard that in order to solve this problem, we need a very elaborate solution. I feel a robust Arms Trade Treaty would constitute a step in the right direction.

Like nearly all non-proliferation and disarmament issues, stemming the illegal flow of SALW is extremely difficult. SALW ultimately represent an impediment to one day attaining world peace. I feel exceptionally honored to have the opportunity to actively participate in seeking a solution to a global issue as important as peace and disarmament through this Conference.

Honorary Conference Blogger and Student,
Honma Yoshiki

 

今日、私は国連軍縮会議のセッションⅢ「小型兵器・軽火器の管理」を傍聴しに行きました。

 いわゆる「小型武器」とは、国連小型武器政府専門家パネルの報告書によれば、兵士一人で携帯、使用が可能な狭義の小型武器、兵士数名で運搬、使用が可能な軽兵器、弾薬及び爆発物の3種類があり、一般的にはこれらを総称して「小型武器」というそうです。傍聴で、小型武器の使用により、毎年約50万人の人が殺されていることを聞いて衝撃を受けました。

 事実、小型武器は「事実上の大量破壊兵器」と呼ばれ、小型武器は、紛争を長期化、激化させるだけではなく、紛争終了後、国連などによる人道援助活動や復興開発を阻害し、紛争の再発、犯罪の増加等を助長する原因になっているそうです。この問題を解決するためには「非常に複雑な問題で非常に複雑な解決策」と聞きました。

 軍縮と同じように、この問題を考えれば考えるほど、わからなくなります。ただ、私はこのセッションを傍聴し、平和の実現を阻む背景を知りました。私は自立した一人の人間として平和とは何かと考え、特別セッションに望みたいと思います。

Vincent – ヴィンセント

Thank you everyone for visiting this blog. I am Vincent, a Malaysian who has been studying in Japan for the past 5 years. I had very little knowledge of the issue of “disarmament” prior to being offered the chance to take part in the Conference on Disarmament Issues. For this, I feel very lucky as this is my last year as a student and taking part in the “Special Session: World Student Peace Meeting” on the final day of the Conference represents an incredible opportunity.

Malaysia is a multiracial country in which the people enjoy the right to freedom of religion. Having grown up in such a lovely and peaceful country, and having had the chance to serve in the Malaysian National Service, I’ve come to appreciate the merits of military service, even in a peaceful country like Malaysia. After much debate and discussion with my fellow classmates, I’ve come to appreciate the importance of disarmament issues as well. Hearing the opinion of specialists from around the world at the Conference on Disarmament Issues will undoubtedly be a mind blowing experience from which I expect to learn much.

I will be blogging here on the 2nd day of the Conference. Stay tuned!

みなさん!軍縮会議のブログへようこそ。私はヴィンセントと申します。マレーシアからの留学生で、日本にきて5年目となりました。実は、この会議に参加する前に、’軍縮’という言葉を一度も聞いたことがありません。ちょうど3月に卒業しますが(卒業論文と発表が無事に終わればの話)、卒業する前に国連と関わるようなイベントに参加できて自分がとてもラッキーだと思っています。

マレーシアは多民族、多宗教の国であり、紛争もなく平和な国です。高校を出てからわずかではあるが、国の兵隊に参加しました。それをきっかけに兵隊のメリットや国への大切さを知ることができました。本会議に参加し、議論や新しいアイデアなどを聞いて、自分の勉強や成長の糧にもなると思うので、非常に楽しみにしています。

私は2日目からここにブログしますので、お楽しみにしてください!kuala_lumpur__the_capital_of_malaysia

Aye – エイ

Hallo all! My name is Aye and I am a Myanmarian student studying in Japan. I’d like to talk briefly about my thoughts on disarmament prior to getting caught up in all of the Conference activity. A political system such as the one found in my homeland of Myanmar leads one to ask “Exactly what is the military for?” Most people think of the military as the force that protects the country and goes to war. But, in Myanmar half of all public officials are members of the armed forces. It has been this way since I was child. For this reason, I feel that the military plays a very important and necessary role in Myanmar distinct from other countries.
When I first heard about “disarmament”, I didn’t wholly understand its meaning. After much debate with my classmates, I began to understand the importance of disarmament, especially in a global context. I’ve since taken a personal interest in the issue of disarmament and have learned much on the topic. I am truly looking forward to hearing the opinions of the distinguished participants at the 24th annual UN Conference on Disarmament Issues.

Your student blogger,
Aye

こんばんは、私はミャンマーから日本に留学しているエーニンプインアウン(エイ)です。

軍縮会議の活動を参加し始めた時の私のことを話したいと思います。私の母国は軍事政権の国です。おそらく、皆さんは軍人と聞いたら国を守る、戦争に出るということを先に思い浮かべると思います。しかし、ミャンマーでは空港や市役所、国の関係の建物で働く人たちの半分ぐらいは軍人であるため、子供時から自分の生活の中で軍人がいるのは当たり前のこと、必要であると感じました。だから、最初「軍縮」と聞いた時、なんのために軍縮するのが自分の中ですごく疑問でしたし、全く理解できませんでした。この活動を通して、世界中で行われている「軍縮」の意味が分かるようになり、非常に勉強にもなりました。軍縮会議本番で沢山の方々の意見を聞けることがすごく楽しみです。

それでは!
エイ

Image

24th UN Conference on Disarmament Issues – 国連軍縮会議

Hello all! Welcome and we hope you are doing well! Firstly, we’d like to take a moment to introduce ourselves as your faithful Conference bloggers. Vincent is a Malaysian student who is studying in Japan; Aye is a Myanmarian student studying in Japan; and Shoko is from Japan. We’ll all be reporting from Shizuoka and can’t wait for the 24th UN Conference on Disarmament Issues to start! As this will be our first time attending such an event, we are looking forward to learning as much as possible while sharing our different experiences and perspectives at the Conference with all of you. See you guys around!

Your student bloggers,
Vincent, Aye and Shoko

はじめまして、みなさん!私たちは、ヴィンセント(マレーシア)、エイ(ミャンマー)、聖子(日本)です。

今回、私たちは学生として国連軍縮会議に参加し、会議の様子を静岡市からレポートしたいと思います!

このような大きなイベントに参加するのは初めてなので、この会議をお伝えすることを通して、私たち自身も貴重な経験ができることを楽しみにしています!

それでは!

ヴィンセント・エイ・聖子